Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Haunted House Novels, Stephen King Flowchart, the Default Haunted House

A Spine-Tingling Reading List of Haunted House Novels
- Claire Fuller, Electric Lit






The Stephen King Universe Flowchart
- Tessiegirl, Art+Charts+Life
How Victorian Mansions Became the Default Haunted House
- Erin Blakemore, Jstor Daily

8 comments:

  1. I grew up in a Victorian house, not a mansion by any means, but I really liked the high ceilings, pocket doors, and radiators. I was less fond of the lack of central air conditioning, even though it was cooler then.

    I already used to have dreams about going back there and finding things I'd hidden in my desk drawers, or the drawers under my bed, or in the attic. Those dreams took on a whole nother life after I helped move my mom out of that house when she got sick.

    Because my parents worried that D&D would be too fascinating and distracting for me, one of the things I actually did hide were my roleplaying materials, which were pretty meager. But in my dreams, I find whole manuscripts written in marker in a child's handwriting.

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    1. It’s really facinating to me that reading and math were pushed so hard, but a hobby that involved both came under suspicion for such a variety of ills, many of them like “too booksish” and “involved with satan” were and are just weird- and more than a little embarrasing. It reminds me of the simpson’s quote “He’s learning on his own! Let’s get him!”

      The enrity of Baby boomer existence can be gleaned from proper study of the mullet.

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    2. @Anne

      That is fascinating!

      For me, the thing I wasn't allowed to have was Fangoria Magazine. I could watch all the horror movies I wanted, but for some reason Fangoria was a step too far.

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  2. That Victorian Haunt thing is really a great look at how sentiment swung. These buildings definitely have the involutions that turn into hiding places and dreams. It's funny because our untested Edward Hopper Death Trip theory has a hard economic cycle component where the rhythm of housing crashes builds up layers of bankruptcies, suicides and ultimately ghosts in the hulks that survive. Fangoria!

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    1. @bombasticus

      You have to wonder if all those fake Gothic ruins they built on estates in the 18th century became more haunted when the money ran out. Maybe that was the plan all along--if you built it, they will come.

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    2. That's really good. My initial thought was you'd need to persuade the family to make bad choices . . . buy the wrong periodicals and leave them lying around, maybe trap the occasional servant in a priest hole to mummify. But with discipline and the right luck (good and bad) in the market you could ultimately grow yourself quite a spectral netherworld right there in the green and pleasant land. If you aren't careful that's the novel you could send to the Ghosts & Scholars people one of these years.

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    3. I don't think you even have to persuade families to make bad choices; that's what families are for.

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    4. Thank God they tend to break apart then or every square inch would be crawling in ghosts!

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